We have created a number of videos to showcase various aspects of the project. These are all on our Youtube channel, but you can also view them all below.

 

UK Rivers Prize 2018 #13

Our most recent Youtube Video. The Hills to Levels project was chosen as one of the four finalists in the UK River Prize 2018. This is the short video we made in order to showcase the project. The Hills to Levels project went on to win the overall UK Rivers Prize 2018 - you can read more about this here.

 


Scroll down to view our entire video catalogue in chronological order...
 

Filter Soxx #1

Filter Soxx are a natural flood management measure used to intercept water flow pathways in fields, particularly in areas where this causes issues such as flooding roads. Run-off, which is likely to be carrying soil with it, is slowed down allowing sediment to settle and be kept within the field. This is just one of the natural flood management measures currently taking place across Somerset.

 


Woody Dams #2

Woody Dams are just one example of natural flood management measures being installed across Somerset to help reduce flooding.

Historically, woody dams that occurred naturally were removed, because they were believed to impair fish migration and cause local flooding. Now, we are seeking to re-introduce woody dams in the right locations, as research has shown that they are essential to stream health and slow the flow.

Leaky woody dams: Improve physical and chemical water quality / Provide benefits for wildlife / And function as natural downstream flood prevention

 


Woodland Planting #3

Woodland Planting is just one example of natural flood management measures being installed across Somerset to help reduce flooding. In times of heavy rainfall, higher up in river catchments, trees help soak up groundwater, and prevent excessive water run-off. With careful consideration to existing species of trees, these plantations blend in seamlessly with their surroundings.

 


Leaky Pond #4

A 'Leaky Pond' is just one example of natural flood management being undertaken across Somerset to help reduce flooding. In times of flooding, it is important to store as much water as possible, safely, higher up in the catchment. This example, installed in the valley of a steeply sloping field, features a dug out pond, outlet pipe with different flow characteristics, and a bund to allow farm machinery to cross.

 


Riverbank Stabilisation #5

Fast-flowing rivers can quickly cause problems for landowners. In this case, the River Isle in Somerset was eating into a farmer's field. We installed rock rolls in order to firm up the riverbank, stopping erosion at these points. It also has a knock on effect that soil is no longer carried with the water, so there is less chance of deposits building up in culverts, and less of a requirement to dredge rivers downstream. The aim of the Hills to Levels Project is to reduce both regional and localised flooding in Somerset, with a message that every field, every farm and every field has a part to play in flooding.

 


Floodplain Storage #6

When river levels rise at this site in Somerset, flood water can be stored in an area of land which has been scraped. A raised bank, or bund, holds the floodwater in, and helps to prevent further flooding downstream in, for example, the Somerset Levels. The aim of the Hills to Levels Project is to reduce both regional and localised flooding in Somerset, with a message that every field, every farm and every field has a part to play in flooding.

 


Reconnecting Floodplains #7

As part of the Hills to Levels project in Somerset, Lidar data has been collected in order to establish the whereabouts of old floodplains, in order to reconnect them. This data allows us to map the ground in 3D. We have dug out a channel to allow a rising river to flow into a field, storing huge amounts of floodwater.
The aim of the Hills to Levels Project is to reduce both regional and localised flooding in Somerset, with a message that every field, every farm and every field has a part to play in flooding.

 


Leaky Pond Cascade #8

Hills to Levels Case Study:
This Hills to Levels scheme has been designed to divert water away from the farmyard, where it was causing issues, and move it into areas where it can be managed more effectively. It is an example of two landowners working together to reduce and manage run-off, where one farmer came up with the concept and FWAG were able to facilitate the scheme with advice and Hills to Levels funding.

 


A View From Above #9

This film showcases some of our natural flood management work from above. Please get in touch if you can help slow the flow.

 


Introduction to Soil Compaction and Infiltration (Part 1) #10

The first of three videos about soil compaction and infiltration provides an introduction to soil function and its important role within river catchments. The topics covered include soil composition, soil hydrology, the effects of soil degradation and how to identify soil compaction.

 


Soil Compaction and Infiltration in Grassland (Part 2) #11

The second of three videos about soil compaction and infiltration looks at grassland soils. This video covers how to identify compaction in grassland, methods to address different types of compaction, examples of common soil issues with case studies including infiltration testing, and ways to prevent compaction in the future.

 


Soil compaction and infiltration on Arable Ground (Part 3) #12

The third of three videos about soil compaction and infiltration looks closely at arable systems. In this video we assess soil structure in three different soil types, discuss cultivation techniques, how to improve organic matter and ways to minimise compaction in the future.

 

 


Click here to go back to the Hills to Levels homepage to learn more about an aspect of the project, or go directly to the 'Multiple Benefits' page